LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for GERMAN-CFP-L Archives


GERMAN-CFP-L Archives

GERMAN-CFP-L Archives


GERMAN-CFP-L@PO.MISSOURI.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

GERMAN-CFP-L Home

GERMAN-CFP-L Home

GERMAN-CFP-L  January 2013

GERMAN-CFP-L January 2013

Subject:

CFP: GSA Seminar "Recycling Romanticism" (02/01/2013)

From:

"Schmidt, Olaf" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

German Studies CFP Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 21 Jan 2013 16:58:58 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (82 lines)

Seminar 12: “Recycling Romanticism”
Organizers: Laurie Johnson (Associate Professor of German, University
of Illinois); May Mergenthaler (Assistant Professor of German, Ohio
State University)

The claim that we still live in the shadow of Romanticism, with its
contradictory and ambivalent tendencies toward utopian (some say
totalitarian) ideals and ironic criticism, has often been repeated by
scholars of the period’s literature, philosophy, and culture—most
insistently perhaps in the wake of the 1960s’ cultural movements.
Romanticism is frequently invoked as a precursor of contemporary
political trends, including environmentalism and the Occupy movement.
Scholars of literature, and of German studies in particular, equally
emphasize the ongoing relevance of the period, and the field of
Romantic studies continues to flourish. However, these scholars
usually focus less on how the past informs the present than on how the
present changes our views of the past, taking into account current
political and social concerns or academic trends (i.e., the affective
turn, gender studies, ecocriticism, literature and science,
transnationalism, post-colonialism, media studies, political theory).
Some also explore Romantic traces in contemporary arts and culture
(i.e., in contemporary poetry, fiction, and film, alternative
religious movements, or Chinese consumerism); more rare are attempts
to view the period with the aim of better understanding current
problems, like economic crises.

This seminar will present a forum for discussing some or all of these
ways of “Recycling Romanticism” by bringing together scholars of
literature and culture to explore the movement’s echoes and
permutations from the late eighteenth century to the present.  We
especially welcome discussions of what we contend is the progressive
promise of those forms of Romanticism that differ sharply from the
conservative or reactionary tendencies of the movement. Our interest
lies not only in what we can learn from Romanticism or how we can
understand Romanticism from contemporary points of view, but also in
reflections on what it means to “recycle” old ideas and on the views
of history and culture as well as academic research itself that
underlie recent attempts to reclaim the past for the present.  We hope
that the seminar discussions of pre-circulated papers will inspire and
continue the type of critical re-engagement with Romanticism that we
see in scholarly work across the fields of German Studies and
Romanticism studies today.

Additionally, we hope that the seminar will create a productive
feedback loop with the special issue of Seminar (July 2014) on “The
New German Romanticism” (edited by Laurie Johnson, a co-organizer of
the proposed GSA seminar).  Articles for this issue will be solicited
early in 2013, and will undergo the review and revision process from
Fall 2013 to Spring 2014. Our aim is to have at least some of the
authors of the articles that will appear in the special issue also
participate in the proposed GSA seminar, as the timing of the GSA
conference intersects very well with the process of review and
revision for the special issue. Interaction between the conference
seminar and the journal issue could enrich the journal articles while
also bringing the topic to the attention of the wider academic public
of the GSA.

A note about format: we would like to divide the seminar into three
subsections, according to thematic groupings (to be determined once
the abstracts have been submitted and the participant list has been
finalized). The co-organizers also will submit papers, and will
facilitate each day’s discussions. The members of each subsection will
read each other’s papers in depth, with papers to be circulated no
later than three weeks prior to the conference. All seminar members
will read all paper abstracts. We will meet as an entire group each
day of the conference, with a focus on a different subsection theme
during each session.

Those who wish to submit a proposal should fill out the GSA Seminar
Application Form (to be found here:
https://www.thegsa.org/news/index.html#Seminars) and email it to the
Seminar Coordinator for this session, Lutz Koepnick at
[log in to unmask] In addition to other information, the form asks
for a brief statement of purpose. It should describe the participant’s
qualifications and planned contribution to the seminar.

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Olaf Schmidt
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://grs.missouri.edu/resources/gerlistserv.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



PO.MISSOURI.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager