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GERMAN-CFP-L  August 2009

GERMAN-CFP-L August 2009

Subject:

Call for Papers: ASECS Meeting in Albuquerque (March 18-21, 2010)

From:

"Schmidt, Olaf" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

German Studies CFP Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:17:15 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (167 lines)

 
The Call for Papers for the 2010 ASECS Annual Meeting, March 18-21 is
now available at: http://asecs.press.jhu.edu/.
________________________________________________________________________

Sessions seeking submissions:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ballads and Song in  Eighteenth-Century Culture"  Ruth Perry;
Literature Faculty, 14N-415, MIT, Cambridge, 02139; Tel: (617) 253-8876;
Fax: (617) 354-5832; E-mail: [log in to unmask]

To foster explorations of the literary, political, musical, visual,
sociological, psychological and social meaning of ballads and song-- and
oral culture more generally--throughout the world in the long
eighteenth-century century.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"Stoic Thought in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Philosophy" (German
Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies) (Deutsche Gesellschaft für die
Erforschung des 18. Jahrhunderts) (DGEJ)  Andreas Urs Sommer, Deutsches
Seminar II der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Forschungsstelle
Nietzsche-Kommentar der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Platz
der Universität 3, DE-79085 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany; Tel: +1149
(0) 761-2033255; Fax: +1149 (0) 761-2033254; E-mail:
[log in to unmask]

The revival of ancient Stoicism plays a crucial role in the intellectual
formation of Early Modernity. Particularly the ethical strategies to
improve one's own happiness beyond traditional religion were quite
attractive in an Age of insecurity. Therefore it seems to be promising
to analyze the impact of Stoic thought and its transformation also in
eighteenth century philosophy and literature, when the great period of
Neo-Stoicism was already over. This session tries to follow the path of
Stoic thought through different stages. Proposals from junior scholars
are explicitly welcome.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

I welcome proposals for the following standard-format session for the
ASECS 2010 meeting in Albuquerque (March 18-21):

------------------------------------------------------------------------

'He said, she said': Rape in 18th-Century Law, Fiction, and Moralist Writing

Interdisciplinary session ideally consisting of four panelists working
in one or more of the following areas: colonial literature (with a
special focus on relations between masters and slaves or colonists and
native peoples), legal and/or social history, continental literature, or
British literature.

Please send proposals by Sept. 15 to:

Mary Trouille
[log in to unmask]

Professor of French
Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Illinois State University
Campus Box 4300
Normal, IL 61790-4300
Telephone: 309, 438-7983
Fax: 309, 438-8038

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Birth of Celebrity

Julia Fawcett, 300 Davey Glen Road #3603, Belmont,
CA  94002; Tel: ( 717 ) 793-0708; E-mail: [log in to unmask]

Recent work by ASECS members Joseph Roach and Felicity Nussbaum (among
others) has traced the origins of modern celebrity to the late
seventeenth and mideighteenth centuries.  This panel invites both theoretical 
and historical discussions of celebrity in the long eighteenth century.  
What historical or ideological developments arose to make this shift possible? 
What were the criteria for making oneself a celebrity in the eighteenth century?  
How did celebrities control or fail to control their own images?   
How did the presence of or the association with a celebrity affect how literary 
works (plays, autobiographies, performances, novels) were read or interpreted?  
How did this celebrity culture arise from, situate itself within, or complicate 
the move to a bourgeois public sphere?  And how do studies of celebrity add to 
our understanding of how character was read, projected, evaluated, or remembered
in the long eighteenth century?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Contagious Inspiration: Envisioning Enthusiasm in the Eighteenth Century

Characterized as false ideas imprinted on the brain by a mix-up of
sensory input, enthusiasm of the eighteenth-century kind traversed
diverse aspects of social life and various forms of cultural production.
Critics and satirists like Hogarth, Swift, Fielding and Burke tackled
the subject in a number of representations of dissenters (religious and
otherwise) that ridiculed ranting, tub-thumping and intoxication
(spiritually and literally), fanaticism, and superstition in order to
condemn or mock the public expression of private revelation. This
seminar will consider various representations of enthusiasm, including
contemporary ideas surrounding insanity and mental instability, the
debate over the nature of vision, and the prominent role religious and
political enthusiasts played in eighteenth-century life. Who were the
men and women so branded and how were they represented in cultural
productions? How does the concept of enthusiasm intersect with the
culture of sensibility that flourished during the late-eighteenth
century? Paper proposals addressing different aspects of this notion -
especially those that consider satirical representations - over the long
eighteenth century are encouraged.

Email proposals to: Hope Saska, Detroit Institute of Art, [log in to unmask]
( t: (313) 833-9832, f: 313-833-8629) and Amanda Lahikainen, Brown
University, [log in to unmask]

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Contrary Marys: The Fictionalizing of Wollstonecraft; Virginia Cope,
Associate Professor, The Ohio State University, ( 740 ) 587 5251,
[log in to unmask]

  I would like to invite proposals investigating the fictional
portrayals of Mary Wollstonecraft that proliferated in the ten years
after her death--not only those directly commenting on her legacy or
character (such as Godwin's biography) but those fictionalized versions
of Wollstonecraft that appeared in works such as Maria Edgeworth's
Belinda (1801), Amelia Opie's Adeline Mowbray (1804), and Frances
Burney's The Wanderer (1814).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"New Perspectives on Lessing's Later Works" (The Lessing Society) Monika
Nenon, Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures, U. of Memphis,
Memphis 38152; Tel: (901) 678-4094; Fax:  (901) 678-5338; E-mail:
[log in to unmask]

Lessing's later works address a whole range of questions such as the
relationship between reason and religion, good government, the
institutions of civil society, ethics, etc. Instead of concentrating on
individual works, this panel would seek to explore the question whether
there are some general underlying themes that are at work in this period
of his writing and serve to provide an overall unity to it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cultures of the Gothic (Cultural Studies Panel)

Gothic representations self-consciously bring the present face to face
with the past and, sometimes in more subtle ways, explore and refract
confrontations between European cultures and the cultures of Asia,
Africa, and the Americas.  While many genres explore these fault lines,
the Gothic aesthetic, arguably, is defined by them.  This panel welcomes
papers that explore the overlapping temporal and geographical
confrontations in the Gothic-tensions between the antique and the
modern; the rude and the sophisticated; the East and the West; old
worlds and new ones--and the various ways in which the temporal and the
geographical become mapped on to each other.  All approaches and
disciples welcome. 
Send abstract to Laura Rosenthal, [log in to unmask]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Acting Assistant Editor:  Olaf Schmidt
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html

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