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GERMAN-CFP-L  September 2008

GERMAN-CFP-L September 2008

Subject:

CFP: Assorted Panels: More Asecs '09, Bloomington 18th Cent. Workshop, & ASECS at MLA

From:

Megan McKinstry <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

German Studies CFP Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 11 Sep 2008 12:46:35 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (285 lines)

>>
>>
>>Panels seeking additional paper submissions for 2009 ASECS Annual Meeting:
>>
>>"Ballads and Songs in the Eighteenth Century" Ruth Perry, MIT,
>>[log in to unmask]
>>
>>This session explores the meaning and effects of ballads and/or ballad
>>singers in any aspect of eighteenth-century social, cultural, or
>>political life.
>>
>>*****
>>
>>"Tragedy at the Turn of the Century"
>>
>>This panel seeks papers that explore any aspect of tragedy at the end of
>>the seventeenth century and the beginning of the eighteenth century.
>>Papers are welcome that explore the period of the late 1680s through the
>>1720s, and possible paper topics might address the relationship between
>>tragedy and politics, crises, imperialism, commerce, aesthetics, and/or
>>staging. Papers addressing changes in attitudes about the genre of
>>tragedy at the end of the seventeenth century are especially welcome.
>>Please send abstracts to Misty Krueger at [log in to unmask] before
>>September 15.
>>
>>******
>>
>>   WomenÝs Poetry and Affairs of State
>>
>>Proposals are invited that analyze women poetsÝ treatment of affairs of
>>state; presentations on state politics in any geographical region are
>>encouraged.
>>Papers might analyze one or more of the following: the scope and nature
>>of references to affairs of state; the range of ideological positions to
>>these affairs;
>>the language, forms, techniques, and tones in womenÝs poetry about state
>>politics; and the role of gender, class, and race in these formulations.
>>Ideally
>>papers will both analyze specific poems by women and venture broader
>>arguments and questions to kindle discussion with the audience,
>>including how
>>womenÝs poetic handling of affairs of state compares with cases in the
>>traditional male canon. Please send abstracts of 250-500 words by e-mail to
>>[log in to unmask] or by regular mail to Jennifer Keith, Department of
>>English, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, P.O. Box 26170,
>>Greensboro, NC 27402-6170
>>
>>*****
>>   ýContinental Receptions of British Political Economyţ
>>
>>Natalie Roxburgh, Graduate Program of Literatures In English, Murray
>>Hall, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 510 George St., New
>>Brunswick, NJ
>>08901-1167; Tel: (848) 391-4291; Fax:  (732) 932-7875; E-mail:
>>[log in to unmask]
>>
>>In the Anglophone world, economic historians often begin their
>>historical inquiries by tracing economic thought back to Adam Smith, the
>>father of the
>>laissez-faire critique of mercantilism and thus the beginning of the
>>ýneoclassicalţ period. Within the logic of a self-regulating market,
>>this transition is one that
>>ended the tyranny of ýmercantilismţ by disaggregating exchange from
>>limits placed on trade by the state. But the distinction between
>>capitalism and mercantilism
>>gets slippery when one considers the way other parts of the world were
>>reading these British thinkers.
>>
>>In Germany, for instance, James SteuartÝs Inquiry into the Principles of
>>Political Oeconomy (1767), often read as a mercantilist document,
>>influenced
>>German cameralists whose project was providing for the public. What
>>allows for the new definition of limitless capital is the paper money,
>>whose value
>>becomes linked to an aggregate structure, a ýnationţ or ýeconomyţ or
>>ýcommonwealth,ţ that allows it to be recognized as a form of generally
>>accepted credit.
>>In other words, political economy implies thinking of the world of
>>obligation as a system. Different nation states have different systems
>>and organizations, which
>>inevitably yields different appropriations of and definitions of
>>political economy.
>>
>>This panel will rethink the mercantilist/capitalist distinction by
>>tracing receptions of less read figures as they influenced economic
>>thought, philosophy, and
>>public policy in Europe in the long eighteenth century. British
>>theorists may include (but are not limited to): Thomas Mun, Edward
>>Misseldon, Gerard de Malynes,
>>William Petty, John Law, David Hume, David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill,
>>Thomas Robert Malthus, and Jeremy Bentham. Continental thinkers might
>>include Richard
>>Cantillon, Jean-Baptiste Colbert, Ferdinando Galiani, Fran┴ois Quesnay,
>>Jacques Turgot, Jean-Baptiste Say, and Johann Heinrich Gottlob Justi.
>>Papers emphasizing
>>literature, philosophy, economics, or critiques of political economy are
>>all welcome.
>>
>>
>>*********
>>ýHeteronormativity in Eighteenth-Century Studiesţ (WomenÝs Caucus Panel)
>>
>>The eighteenth century, as we have often been told, witnesses the birth
>>of sexuality and the birth of the public sphere at once.  What we have
>>less often
>>been told are the ways in which these two seemingly asymmetrical
>>developments intersect, whether during the period or within the critical
>>discourses and
>>   scholarly practices that have since accumulated around it.  In ýSex in
>>Public,ţ Lauren Berlant and Michael Warner define heteronormativity as
>>the ýinstitutions,
>>structures of understanding, and practical orientations that make
>>heterosexuality seem not only coherent Í but also privileged.ţ  As they
>>note, ý[c]ontexts that
>>have little visible relation to sex practice, such as life narrative and
>>generational identity, can be heteronormative in this sense,ţ
>>reinforcing the ýinvisible, tacit,
>>society-forming rightnessţ of heterosexuality, even as the ýcoherence of
>>heterosexualityţ assumes ever more ýprovisionalţ and ýsometimes
>>contradictoryţ forms.
>>
>>Are the long eighteenth century and/or eighteenth-century studies
>>ýheteronormativeţ in this respect?  If so, in what ways has feminism
>>served to destabilize or
>>stabilize that heteronormativity?
>>
>>Submit electronic abstracts by September 15 to Abby Coykendall at
>>[log in to unmask]
>>bic
>>scholarship into the long eighteenth century.
>>
>>*******
>>
>>"The Rights of Women and Orientalism" Emily M. N. Kugler; 4445 Fanuel
>>Street, Apt. 7, San Diego, CA 92109; Tel: (858) 397-3355; E-mail:
>>[log in to unmask]
>>
>>Eighteenth-century advocates of women's rights produced a diverse set of
>>reactions when they turned towards the Near East for imagery for their
>>arguments. Some like Mary Wollstonecraft imagined an Orient synonymous
>>with tyranny, acting as a symbol of what was wrong with England's
>>treatment of women. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, on the other hand, saw in
>>Turkey a positive alternative to English women's interactions with one
>>another. This panel aims to explore the use of Orientalism in debates
>>over women's rights during the long century. A focus on England is
>>preferred, but submissions concerning other nations are also welcome.
>>
>>*****
>>
>>ýTruth and Consequences in Eighteenth-Century Media Cultureţ (Society
>>for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing --- SHARP) Lee
>>Kahan, Dept. of English, Indiana U. South Bend, 1700 Mishawaka Ave.,
>>P.O. Box 7111, South Bend, IN 46634; Tel: (574) 520-4305; E-mail:
>>[log in to unmask]
>>
>>With developments like the rise of the public sphere and the global
>>expansion of trade networks, readers in the eighteenth-century found
>>themselves increasingly invested in media representations of their
>>world, which became an operative force in their daily lives. At the same
>>time, they knew how unreliable the intelligence they consumed could be
>>and that acting upon such false information could have dire political,
>>economic and social consequences. This panel will examine how
>>eighteenth-century writers and readers navigated this catch-22 of media
>>culture.  In what ways did writers
>>exploit the power of mediation?  What strategies did they use to
>>convince readers that they were not doing so? What criteria did readers
>>use to
>>determine which information to trust and which to discard as
>>self-interested or otherwise unreliable? What was at stake in making
>>this decision? How did these problems of truth and trust in a mediated
>>culture help to shape various print genres? We welcome proposals that
>>address these or other
>>questions related to the power of mediation in the first information age.
>>
>>Special consideration will be given to those proposals that place the
>>eighteenth century within a broader history of media culture or that address
>>the place of our period (or lack thereof) in the field of media
>>studies.One need not be a member of SHARP to submit a proposal, but one
>>must be a
>>member of both ASECS (by December 1) and SHARP (by January 15th; the
>>SHARP membership cycle runs from July 1st to June 30th) in order to
>>present on the panel.  For questions about the SHARP membership or
>>general matters related to SHARP, please direct inquiries to Eleanor F.
>>Shevlin, Affiliate Liaison, at [log in to unmask]
>>
>>
>>
>>___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>>Each year ASECS sponsors a scholar session at the annual meeting of AHA,
>>CAA, and MLA.  Because ASECS is an interdisciplinary society, it
>>encourages its members to propose a session (panel, round table) on a
>>topic of broad scholarly interest and one that will have particular
>>resonance and appeal for the constituencies of the AHA (historians), CAA
>>(art historians), and MLA (literary critics).  The deadline for
>>submitting proposals is DECEMBER 15.
>>
>>Proposals should take into account the type of interdisciplinary work
>>encouraged by ASECS.  A non-member status waiver can be requested from
>>the MLA, for scholars working in fields other than language and literature.
>>
>>A submission form is available on the website at:
>>http://asecs.press.jhu.edu/  (NEAR THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE).
>>
>>_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>>
>>Mixed Media, Mixed Messages: Media and Mediality in the Eighteenth Century
>>
>>The Center for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Indiana University is
>>pleased to announce the eighth Bloomington Eighteenth-Century Workshop,
>>to be held
>>on May 13-15 2009. The workshop is part of a series of annual
>>interdisciplinary events that has been running since 2002, with 20-30
>>scholars presenting
>>and discussing papers on a broad topic in a congenial setting.
>>
>>Our topic for 2009 is "Mixed Media, Mixed Messages". In declaring an
>>eighteenth-century "media revolution" most scholarship has focused on
>>the circulation
>>of new printed forms and the emergence of a public sphere. In this
>>workshop we would like to go beyond well-established narratives of print
>>culture, the effects
>>of the printing press and the history of the book, to consider "the
>>media revolution" ˝ if there was one in the eighteenth century ˝ in a
>>wider sense. We are
>>especially interested in the relationships between media, their
>>differences, their limits, and their cultural, social, and/or political
>>ramifications. How are messages
>>affected when the medium changes? To what extent were eighteenth-century
>>actors/agents/cultural producers aware of mediality and mediation, or of
>>the implications
>>of placing form above content? Did the eighteenth century witness a
>>"media revolution"? How effectively can we, in the twenty-first century,
>>assess the cognitive or
>>affective impact and significance of messages first sent in the
>>eighteenth century (and since transmitted through multiple media)?
>>
>>Papers might address topics such as:
>>
>>´ the relationship between the textual and the visual
>>´ the eye, the ear, and the voice (also inner voice)
>>´ spatiality and temporality in different media
>>´ the afterlife of HoraceÝs ut pictura poesis
>>´ pragmatic aspects of new media, such as new forms of teaching (e.g.
>>Alphabetisierung), of reading, of circulation, of institutionalization
>>´ intersections of new media with 18th-century religious practices and
>>spirituality
>>´ the global and local consequences of seriality, repetition and
>>synchronicity
>>´ the implications of media for running and experiencing empires
>>´ the effects of media forms on information and narration
>>´ how are media regulated, and how do media change regulation?
>>´ remediation and a heightened sense of immediacy
>>´ money as medium
>>
>>The workshop format will consist of focused discussion of four to six
>>papers a day, amid socializing and refreshment. The workshop will draw
>>both on the wide
>>community of eighteenth-century scholars and on those working in this
>>field at Indiana University-Bloomington. The workshop will cover most
>>expenses of those
>>scholars chosen to present their work: accommodations, travel (up to a
>>certain limit), and most meals.
>>
>>We are asking for applications to be sent to us by Thursday, January 8,
>>2009. The application consists of a two-page description of the proposed
>>paper as well as
>>a current CV. Please email or send your application to Dr. Barbara
>>Truesdell, Weatherly Hall North, room 122, Bloomington, IN 47405,
>>Telephone 812/855-2856,
>>email [log in to unmask] Papers will be selected by an
>>interdisciplinary committee.
>>
>>For further information please refer to our website,
>>http://www.indiana.edu/~voltaire/ , or contact the director of the
>>Center, Dror Wahrman, Dept. of History,
>>Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, e-mail [log in to unmask]
>>
>>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html

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