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GERMAN-CFP-L  December 2007

GERMAN-CFP-L December 2007

Subject:

Enlightened War

From:

Elisabeth Krimmer <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

German Studies CFP Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 4 Dec 2007 02:56:57 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (86 lines)

CFP REMINDER:


Enlightened War: Theories and Cultures of Warfare in Eighteenth Century
Germany, 1756-1815
Elisabeth Krimmer and Patricia Anne Simpson

War, as an historical event and an object of cultural scrutiny, stands in
apparent opposition to the ideals of the Enlightenment and its legacy, even
though its beliefs in reason and human progress were disclosed in the midst
of European warfare. The foremost philosopher of the time, Immanuel Kant,
theorized not only man’s release from self-inflicted immaturity but also
the possibility of eternal peace. Immanuel Kant’s “Zum ewigen Frieden”
constitutes a major intervention into the debate about eternal peace and
the ethics of power and can be seen as the culminating moment of
Enlightenment culture. And yet, as Enlightened War seeks to demonstrate,
there is an intimate relation between Enlightenment culture and the
practices and theories of war.

Enlightened War investigates the multiple and complex interactions between
Enlightenment discourses and the culture of war. Specific historical wars
shape culture and impact social and cognitive categories. Conversely,
literary and philosophical discourses transform the theory and practice of
war, particularly with regard to the effects on civil society, concepts of
national identity, and gender roles. Eighteenth-century discourses and
practices of war informed Enlightenment thought, which in turn exerted a
legible influence on the practice of war.

The editors welcome proposals from the fields of literary and cultural
studies, history, art history, and musicology among others. Possible topics
and questions include, but are not limited to the following points:

1) Enlightened War seeks to show that, alongside the debate on eternal
peace, there was a tradition that valorized war and praised its ennobling
qualities. In many ways, eighteenth-century thought laid the groundwork for
a discourse that sees in war a springboard to fantasies of transcendence.
We are interested in the conceptual alliance of warfare and the notions of
the sublime and in the relation between the sublime and its inverse, terror. 

2) Enlightened War explores the intimate relation between war and gender
discourses. Which gender discourses inform/ result from the emergence of
the soldier-citizen? Why is there a proliferation of literary texts that
feature women warriors, and how do these texts represent the link between
war and gender? How do constructs of gender conflict with or bolster an
author’s representation of war?

3) Enlightened War explores the relation between war and evolving concepts
of the nation and national identity. With changes wrought by the French
Revolution and Napoleonic conquest, national attributes became more central
to the call for mobilization, especially in the German states. Which
cultural and social changes accompany the transition from “private warfare”
to State-sponsored conflict in which war and nation became intimately
linked? Is there a connection between the military reforms of the period
and cultural and literary practices? What is the relation between war,
revolution, and culture?

4) Finally, Enlightened War investigates the relation between warfare and
human rights discourses. In the eighteenth century, according to Michel
Foucault’s Society Must Be Defended, there was a shift from a society
conceived of as fractious and permeated by warlike relations to a State
endowed with military institutions. This change implied a transition from a
discourse of warring parties to a universal discourse. Based on this
analysis, Enlightened War is interested in the interrelation between
changing practices and discourses of war and the establishment of
discourses of universality, in particular, human rights discourse. With
this volume, we hope to demonstrate the ways in which the culture of war
functions as a constitutive element of Enlightenment discourse. 


Please send 500-word abstracts or inquiries to both editors by December 17,
2007. E-mail submissions preferred:


Elisabeth Krimmer
[log in to unmask]


Patricia Anne Simpson
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*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html

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