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GERMAN-CFP-L  December 2005

GERMAN-CFP-L December 2005

Subject:

CFP: Theatricality in German Prose (grad) (1/15/06; 3/10-11/06)

From:

Megan McKinstry <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

German Studies CFP Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 2 Dec 2005 20:43:42 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

>>
>>From: Ian Egon Morgan <[log in to unmask]>
>>
>>
>>2006 Stanford University Graduate Student Conference in German Studies
>>
>>March 10-11, 2006
>>
>>Stage on the Page
>>
>>Theatricality in German Prose
>>
>>The graduate students of Stanford University's Department of German Studies
>>invite proposals addressing theatricality in German prose. Theatricality
>>has become a prominent concept over the last decade in a variety of fields:
>>anthropology, performance theory, semiotics, and gender-theory. We are
>>interested in the encounter of stage and page. Theatricality in prose
>>necessitates a dispersion of the verbal, visual and corporeal unity which
>>is inherent in performance. What precisely can be understood as
>>‘theatrical’ in prose writing? Does theatricality draw attention to itself
>>as a mode of representation? What influence does theatre have as a
>>performance praxis on the poetics of the novel or novella?
>>Through the invention of photography and motion picture, our world has
>>transformed into an increasingly visual society. How do the rise of the
>>visual and graphic elements of language in contemporary culture affect
>>prose? And if the ever-increasing reliance on visual stimuli has in turn
>>made German prose of the 20th century more visual, how is this related to
>>the theatricality of prose?
>>The reversal of this process is of course the adaptation of novels and other
>>forms of prose to more visual modes, such as theatre, cinema etc. What makes
>>certain prose more ‘visually adaptable’? And what are the means employed by
>>directors in order to excavate the theatricality from such prose and
>>transform it into a visual medium?
>>In light of such adaptations, one also has to consider the fact that many
>>authors have written plays as well as prose. However, literary history
>>usually treats authors either as novelists or as playwrights. Is there a
>>relationship between the message an author wants to convey or the problem
>>he/she tackles with and the preference of one genre? And how do the prose
>>writings of such a writer compare to his/her dramatic work under the aspect
>>of theatricality?
>>
>>Keynote Address: Dr. Martin Puchner, Columbia University
>>
>>Second Speaker: Dr. Charitini Douvaldzi, Stanford University
>>
>>The Stanford Graduate Students in German Studies invite recent graduates and
>>graduate students of all fields to send abstracts and participate in the
>>conference. Besides papers on particular German topics, we also encourage
>>contributions focusing on theoretical issues related to theatricality.
>>Since we hope to open the discussion for students and scholars of other
>>fields, the language of the conference will be English. We will ask
>>participants to send us their paper in advance in order to make them
>>available for all participants. Thereby we hope to enhance the discussion
>>and create a productive working atmosphere.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Possible paper topics could include, but are not limited to:
>>
>>- Gesture in Prose
>>- Crossing Genre: Extended Dialogue in the Novel
>>- Telling and Showing
>>- The Embellished I – Staging of the Self in Autobiographies
>>- Pop Literature and Visual Culture
>>- Film Scripts
>>- Authorial Masks
>>- Interiority as Theatricality’s Antipode
>>- Theatricality in Prose Adaptations
>>- The Berliner Volksbühne and its Reliance on Dostoyevsky’s Prose
>>- Novella and Theatre
>>- The Prose of the World and Theatrical Lies
>>- Visual Effects in Prose
>>
>>
>>Abstracts for papers should be no longer than two pages and sent by January
>>15, 2006  to:
>>
>>Dept. of German Studies
>>Attn: Ian Morgan   Re: Conference
>>Bldg. 260, Pigott Hall, Rm. 211
>>Stanford University
>>Stanford, CA 94305-2030
>>(if a street address is necessary, use 260 Lasuen Mall)
>>
>>or via E-mail to [log in to unmask]
>>
>>Please send any questions to Ian Morgan at the same address.
>>
>>This information can also be found at
>>http://www.stanford.edu/dept/german/index.html
>>
>>For more information on Dr. Puchner, please go to
>>http://www.columbia.edu/~hmp10/
>>
>>For more information on Dr. Douvaldzi, please go to
>>http://www.stanford.edu/dept/german/faculty/douvaldzi.html
>>
>
>
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html

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