LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for TSE Archives


TSE Archives

TSE Archives


TSE@PO.MISSOURI.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Monospaced Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

TSE Home

TSE Home

TSE  February 2003

TSE February 2003

Subject:

Hofgarten and the hyacinth garden

From:

[log in to unmask]

Reply-To:

T. S. Eliot Discussion forum.

Date:

Sun, 9 Feb 2003 03:03:47 EST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (93 lines)

2/9/03

   I'd like to discuss possible connections in 'The Waste Land' between the
Marie passage and the hyacinth passage.

   Clearly, both passages reference a garden ('the Hofgarten' and 'the
hyacinth garden'), but I think there are other parallels as well. What
attracted my attention was a similarity in language structure that I only
recently noticed. If this is all old news to everybody, I apologize.

  In the Marie section there is a line in German:

   "Bin gar keine Russin, stamm' aus Litauen, echt deutsch."

followed by lines in English that begin with a conjunction:

   "And when we were children, staying at the archduke's,"

Opening the lines with "And" implies that the reader is jumping into the
middle of a conversation already in progress. That is, the reader is not
privy to the entire conversation and must guess at what was "ellipsed out",
as well as guess at the significance of the prior conversation.

  In parallel fashion, the hyacinth section begins with German:

    "Frisch weht der Wind
     Der Heimat zu.
     Mein Irisch Kind,
     Wo weilest du?"

followed by lines in English. The opening English lines do not immediately
have a conjunction; however, a conjunction ("Yet") follows quickly:

   "--Yet when we came back, late, from the hyacinth garden,"

As with the "And" in the Marie lines, the "yet" alerts the reader that
something is being "ellipsed out", and again the reader is left to guess at
the significance of what is missing.

   In the hyacinth passage, the lines are 'framed' with a final line in
German:

   "Oed' und leer das Meer."

Interestingly, looking at the facsimile edition shows that it was Ezra Pound
that put in the final German line from 'Tristan and Isolde' to complete the
'frame'. In Eliot's version, the hyacinth passage OPENED with the German
lines but did not end with German. That is, in Eliot's original version the
structure was a match to the Marie structure.

   It should be noted that this is the ONLY use of German in the poem, so I
don't think all this is a coincidence. I think the reader is being given
linguistic clues that the Marie section and the hyacinth section are deeply
related.

   Quite a while back, I posted excerpts from an analysis by P. K. Saha, who
pointed out the often unnoticed references to Dante in the hyacinth section.
Saha pointed out that "I was neither living nor dead" is the equivalent to
lines at the end of inferno ("I did not die and I did not remain alive"),
which expresses Dante's sense of fear and paralysis when he sees Lucifer.
Similarly, "Looking into the heart of light, the silence" is equivalent to
lines at the end of Paradiso when Dante sees God. In my post on Saha's
findings, I asked why would Eliot write a passage about a dead lover (as per
the 'Tristan and Isolde' frame) that combines a vision of seeing God and
Lucifer? Why would he express feelings of confronting, at the same moment,
overwhelming love with overwhelming terror? My speculation was that Eliot (as
the narrator) was actually writing about his guilt over his homosexuality,
and that the relationship depicted in the hyacinth garden was actually a
depiction of a homosexual relationship (between Eliot and Jean Verdenal).
Thus, the consummation of that relationship, for Eliot, was an impossible
combination of meeting God and Lucifer simultaneously.

   Expanding on these ideas, I think some of the images in the Marie section
can be explained. Marie reflects about her experience on the sled with a mix
of excitement and fear:

  " . . . he took me out on a sled,
  And I was frightened. He said, Marie,
  Marie, hold on tight. And down we went.
  In the mountains, there you feel free."

I don't think it's much of a stretch to see that Eliot is drawing an analogy
between the mix of excitement and fear of children sledding and adults
beginning a sexual relationship ("hold on tight. And down we went"). It's the
same mix that will be amplified by the Inferno/Paradiso lines in the hyacinth
section.

   There are other points to make, such as possible poetic meanings of the
translated line from the Marie section, but I don't want this post to get too
long. If there's interest in discussing the Marie section (and it's possible
links to the hyacinth section), I'm up for it.

-- Steve --

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



PO.MISSOURI.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager