LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for TSE Archives


TSE Archives

TSE Archives


TSE@PO.MISSOURI.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

TSE Home

TSE Home

TSE  August 2001

TSE August 2001

Subject:

Re: Definition of art

From:

"Nancy Gish" <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 18 Aug 2001 15:55:14 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (67 lines)

How do you deal with problems like the following (none of which are 
originated by me):

Intention is not what art necessarily reveals or expresses.  Consider Eliot's 
claim, for example, that the artist has something to get off his chest and 
does not know what it is until he does (paraphrase) or the notion of the 
"intentional fallacy" or the claim that language is always slipping (or in 
Eliot's words "Words strain,/ Crack and sometimes break, under the 
burden/ Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,/ Decay with imprecision, will 
not stay in place" so that poetry (and by extension, art) cannot exactly 
represent intention?  Or in the terms of deconstruction, it is always 
subverting itself and representing more or other or contradictions of what it 
may "intend."

The three "communities" you describe are not necessarily separate except 
theoretically.  Eliot was both poet and critic, and he was a Ph.D. who 
lectured in universities.  In the US, where there is no other way to support 
art, artists are very often academics.  "The rest of us" may well create or 
teach.

And my question would be, "How does this tell us what 'art' IS as opposed 
to how we agree on it or not?"
Nancy


Date sent:      	Sat, 18 Aug 2001 19:11:59 +0000
Send reply to:  	[log in to unmask]
From:           	"Steve Morse" <[log in to unmask]>
To:             	[log in to unmask]
Subject:        	Re: Definition of art

To me it seems there are two roads to "art"-- intention and acclaim.
Sometimes these two roads converge and run along the same harmonious 
way,
like an interstate and a state highway sharing the same concrete and
traffic for the most part flows smoothly. The artist and the audience both
agree THIS (whatever "this" is) IS ART!

At other times these two roads are estranged and may intersect at various
angles whereupon traffic signals, or "definitions," are thrown up as
defensive necessities. The artist says "This is art because I intended it
to be so" and the audience disagrees because it does not like or
understand, or it feels threatened by, the intention of the artist.

The audience in this case has three main components: the artists'
community (yes you CAN be on both roads at once), the academic 
community
(those who study and arbitrate but do not produce art), and the market
(the rest of us who may or may not like what we are told by the other two
communities). It is in this tripartite mix that definitions will be born.
The artist's intention alone stands no chance of survival and achieves
only minimal survival if but one of these three audience communities
acclaims the intention. If, however, the artist's intention can garner the
acclaim of any two of these three communities the intention will prosper;
and if all three communities acclaim the intention IS "art," then the
intention will thrive and become a definition of "art," where the roads
have converged. Not all this acclaim  may happen smoothly, nor even with
one conscious mind toward that end. This is the way we recognize art,
large-scale subjectivity, as a process of politics and communications,
never defined but always being defined, roads we are willing to travel.


______________________________________________________________
___
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at 
http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



PO.MISSOURI.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager