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TSE  June 2001

TSE June 2001

Subject:

RE: A Mighty Syllogism Our god (was Re: poetry collections

From:

"Arwin van Arum" <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 10 Jun 2001 17:59:12 +0200

Content-Type:

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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What I meant when I referred to French was that Eliot's most important
modernist influence was French poetry, and that is very very good poetry. If
you want to understand Eliot's modernism, then the French inspirations are
very important, and as modernist poetry I'm fairly certain that in time they
will be recognised as being the most important modernist poems. Although,
then again, it depends on what and for whom. But then in these cases it
usually helps, for everyone, you and me included, to include a reminder
who's opinion or perspective you're presenting.

At least, *I* think so. ;-)

A.
  -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
  Van: [log in to unmask]
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]Namens [log in to unmask]
  Verzonden: zondag 10 juni 2001 17:35
  Aan: [log in to unmask]
  Onderwerp: Re: A Mighty Syllogism Our god (was Re: poetry collections


  In a message dated 06/10/2001 10:53:32 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
  [log in to unmask] writes:




      Thanks, Kate, sometimes it's helpful to have the ridiculous stated in
    order to appreciate the sublime, e.g. Eliot in Trad. & The Individual
    Talent. The TSE List has long been blessed with a (to me) surprising
number
    of natural comedians, and in your persona, you're unsurpassed. Imagine
if
    what you wrote were somehow true; it would have the effect of making the
    important unimportant.




  Ha ha thanks.
  What I meant to say was:  ha ha.  What I didn't mean to say was: ha ha.
  Of course, there is living today a young man of 22 in China none of us
have
  ever heard of working in the fields all day and then spending part of his
  nights writing incredible poetry, philosophy, etc., in a language I will
  never understand.
  Of course, there are important ancient and not so ancient works written in
  languages I will never understand.  There are, if one wants to read these
  items, translations.
  More to my point:  English has become the world language, the
communication
  language, and even authors living in non-English speaking countries are
aware
  of this fact and proceed accordingly.  Yes, Eliot did sprinkle a
tablespoon
  of French into his equation, but as I am able to translate French using
just
  my own little brain, I forgive him for this transgression.
  As for your last comment, I do not believe that there is universal or even
  local agreement about what is important and unimportant in life or art,
even
  among academia, never mind the others.

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<DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D031565415-10062001>What I=20
meant when I referred to French was that Eliot's most important =
modernist=20
influence was French poetry, and that is very very good poetry. If you =
want to=20
understand Eliot's modernism, then the French inspirations are very =
important,=20
and as modernist poetry I'm fairly certain that in time they will be =
recognised=20
as being the most important modernist poems. Although, then again, it =
depends on=20
what and for whom. But then in these cases it usually helps, for =
everyone, you=20
and me included, to include a reminder who's opinion or perspective =
you're=20
presenting. </SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D031565415-10062001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D031565415-10062001>At=20
least, *I* think so. ;-)</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D031565415-10062001></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D031565415-10062001>A.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE=20
style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: =
5px">
  <DIV align=3Dleft class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr><FONT =
face=3DTahoma=20
  size=3D2>-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----<BR><B>Van:</B>=20
  [log in to unmask] =
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]<B>Namens=20
  </B>[log in to unmask]<BR><B>Verzonden:</B> zondag 10 juni 2001=20
  17:35<BR><B>Aan:</B> [log in to unmask]<BR><B>Onderwerp:</B> Re: A =
Mighty=20
  Syllogism Our god (was Re: poetry =
collections<BR><BR></DIV></FONT><FONT=20
  face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D2>In a message dated 06/10/2001 =
10:53:32 AM=20
  Eastern Daylight Time, <BR>[log in to unmask] writes: <BR><BR><BR>
  <BLOCKQUOTE=20
  style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =
MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"=20
  TYPE=3D"CITE"><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;Thanks, Kate, sometimes it's helpful to =
have the=20
    ridiculous stated in <BR>order to appreciate the sublime, e.g. Eliot =
in=20
    Trad. &amp; The Individual <BR>Talent. The TSE List has long been =
blessed=20
    with a (to me) surprising number <BR>of natural comedians, and in =
your=20
    persona, you're unsurpassed. Imagine if <BR>what you wrote were =
somehow=20
    true; it would have the effect of making the <BR>important =
unimportant.=20
    <BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR><BR>Ha ha thanks. <BR>What I meant to say =
was:=20
  &nbsp;ha ha. &nbsp;What I didn't mean to say was: ha ha. <BR>Of =
course, there=20
  is living today a young man of 22 in China none of us have <BR>ever =
heard of=20
  working in the fields all day and then spending part of his <BR>nights =
writing=20
  incredible poetry, philosophy, etc., in a language I will <BR>never=20
  understand. <BR>Of course, there are important ancient and not so =
ancient=20
  works written in <BR>languages I will never understand. &nbsp;There =
are, if=20
  one wants to read these <BR>items, translations. <BR>More to my point: =

  &nbsp;English has become the world language, the communication =
<BR>language,=20
  and even authors living in non-English speaking countries are aware =
<BR>of=20
  this fact and proceed accordingly. &nbsp;Yes, Eliot did sprinkle a =
tablespoon=20
  <BR>of French into his equation, but as I am able to translate French =
using=20
  just <BR>my own little brain, I forgive him for this transgression. =
<BR>As for=20
  your last comment, I do not believe that there is universal or even =
<BR>local=20
  agreement about what is important and unimportant in life or art, even =

  <BR>among academia, never mind the others.</FONT>=20
</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>

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